Campbell (Nineteenth Century), Elizabeth
'Ibla from Lagnione. 5th May 1825. Sicily' (sic); Elizabeth Campbell watching a Lettiga. Watercolour. Inscribed and dated, 1825. Provenance: An album of watercolours by Elizabeth Campbell. 8x11 inches.

£475

“Hybla formerly renowned for its honey was on the opposite hill. Here we saw two Lettigas travelling; they are the only carriage of the country and like a small coach, or Flybody, or two sedan chairs fastened together: These, by means of two long poles, are slung between two Mules; one preceding the carriage, the other following; these animals have an immense ring of bells on their saddles. A man, generally riding a loaded mule leads the party, having a bridle to the first mule, and a man on foot with a long pole, follows. We were told they get on very fast in this manner over the very bad roads, or rather paths of the country, but the Lettiga is very apt to upset and not unfrequently a mule walks away from the poles, disengaging itself and leaves the traveller to his fate; but the Lettiga mules are obliged to be very obedient, and forced to obtain a pace, a sort of run, which is neither a trot nor a walk but between both and very swift and pleasant to ride.”

This work appears in the Group: ELIZABETH CAMPBELL - SICILY 1825

Description

“Hybla formerly renowned for its honey was on the opposite hill. Here we saw two Lettigas travelling; they are the only carriage of the country and like a small coach, or Flybody, or two sedan chairs fastened together: These, by means of two long poles, are slung between two Mules; one preceding the carriage, the other following; these animals have an immense ring of bells on their saddles. A man, generally riding a loaded mule leads the party, having a bridle to the first mule, and a man on foot with a long pole, follows. We were told they get on very fast in this manner over the very bad roads, or rather paths of the country, but the Lettiga is very apt to upset and not unfrequently a mule walks away from the poles, disengaging itself and leaves the traveller to his fate; but the Lettiga mules are obliged to be very obedient, and forced to obtain a pace, a sort of run, which is neither a trot nor a walk but between both and very swift and pleasant to ride.”