Campbell (Nineteenth Century), Elizabeth
'Salinunti [Salinunte] 15th May 1825. Sicily' (sic); Mr Walker or Mr Moore with Mr Stroud to the left. Elizabeth Campbell riding on the right. Watercolour. Inscribed and dated, 1825. Provenance: An album of watercolours by Elizabeth Campbell. 8x11 inches.

“The third Temple is of colossal size, second only to the one of Jove at Girgenti and there is that about its architecture which leads one to suppose it of older date than the other two. The architecture of all is Doric without any base. These columns are plain and have a more cone like shape and the whole a superior style. It was here that promising young artist Harris lost his life after his efforts had been crowned with success in excavating part of the frieze of one of the Temples, which elucidated a most interesting point of union in the Arts between Egyptian and Grecian Architecture. I subsequently saw the frieze in the Museum at Palermo, just as poor Harris had left them, still in the cases, having been seized by the Government as he intended sending them to England and after four more years neglect are finally in this Museum. As beautiful sculpture I was much disappointed, tho’ the figures are very spirited and expressive. The part the least broken represents Perseus cutting off the Gorgon’s head, a most hideous face, and Pegasus springing from the blood; Perseus has his eyes shut verifying the truth of the fable and a Geni directs his hand. One female figure is supposed to be a victory and all the females have the Egyptian head dress and various ornaments. There was an ornament cut in the stone the precise pattern of that of Baron Judicas in terra cotta. A round tower is on the beach and the far shore was pretty in the light we saw it but inhabitants, if any, did not molest us by their appearance.”

This work appears in the Group: ELIZABETH CAMPBELL - SICILY 1825

Description

“The third Temple is of colossal size, second only to the one of Jove at Girgenti and there is that about its architecture which leads one to suppose it of older date than the other two. The architecture of all is Doric without any base. These columns are plain and have a more cone like shape and the whole a superior style. It was here that promising young artist Harris lost his life after his efforts had been crowned with success in excavating part of the frieze of one of the Temples, which elucidated a most interesting point of union in the Arts between Egyptian and Grecian Architecture. I subsequently saw the frieze in the Museum at Palermo, just as poor Harris had left them, still in the cases, having been seized by the Government as he intended sending them to England and after four more years neglect are finally in this Museum. As beautiful sculpture I was much disappointed, tho’ the figures are very spirited and expressive. The part the least broken represents Perseus cutting off the Gorgon’s head, a most hideous face, and Pegasus springing from the blood; Perseus has his eyes shut verifying the truth of the fable and a Geni directs his hand. One female figure is supposed to be a victory and all the females have the Egyptian head dress and various ornaments. There was an ornament cut in the stone the precise pattern of that of Baron Judicas in terra cotta. A round tower is on the beach and the far shore was pretty in the light we saw it but inhabitants, if any, did not molest us by their appearance.”