Campbell (Nineteenth Century), Elizabeth
Girgenti, 'Temple of Juno. May 13th 1825. Sicily'; Elizabeth Campbell, Mr Walker, Mr Moor and a guide. Watercolour. Inscribed and dated, 1825. Provenance: An album of watercolours by Elizabeth Campbell. 8x11 inches.

£475

“Winding thro’ olive groves we at length reached the famed Temple of Concord, which we did not then stop to examine, but turned to the left to the Temple of Juno Lucina, which is placed upon the highest part of the rock: a most majestic situation and commanding the whole of the delicious view. These rocks were the walls of the city and in them also were cut the tombs: so ordered, it is said, that the soldiers should have the treble incentives to valour, in defence of their City, their Gods, and their Ancestors; for the ancients paid infinitely more respect to the dead than the moderns, and the temples were erected on the lines of the Walls, also to add to their sacredness and make them conspicuous objects. The Temple of Juno, like all the others, is built of the stone of the Country, and this is apparently a species of petrefaction or sandstone, in which are quantities of small shells and we observed by the roadside as we ascended to the city, quantities of large and very beautiful shells fossils: in form a long square, the simple Doric, with fluted columns without any base; many of the columns imperfect and an appearance of the effects of fire upon much of the stone. It is said this Temple was burnt by Gel when the Carthaginians took Girgenti. The inner wall of the Altar may be easily traced and the conduit for water, and immense flat paved space, is before the entry of the Temple to which steps lead up.”

This work appears in the Group: ELIZABETH CAMPBELL - SICILY 1825

Description

“Winding thro’ olive groves we at length reached the famed Temple of Concord, which we did not then stop to examine, but turned to the left to the Temple of Juno Lucina, which is placed upon the highest part of the rock: a most majestic situation and commanding the whole of the delicious view. These rocks were the walls of the city and in them also were cut the tombs: so ordered, it is said, that the soldiers should have the treble incentives to valour, in defence of their City, their Gods, and their Ancestors; for the ancients paid infinitely more respect to the dead than the moderns, and the temples were erected on the lines of the Walls, also to add to their sacredness and make them conspicuous objects. The Temple of Juno, like all the others, is built of the stone of the Country, and this is apparently a species of petrefaction or sandstone, in which are quantities of small shells and we observed by the roadside as we ascended to the city, quantities of large and very beautiful shells fossils: in form a long square, the simple Doric, with fluted columns without any base; many of the columns imperfect and an appearance of the effects of fire upon much of the stone. It is said this Temple was burnt by Gel when the Carthaginians took Girgenti. The inner wall of the Altar may be easily traced and the conduit for water, and immense flat paved space, is before the entry of the Temple to which steps lead up.”