Campbell (Nineteenth Century), Elizabeth
'Syracuse and Ortygia [Ortigia] part of the Amphitheatre aqueduct & Theatre. May 7. 1825 - Sicily' (sic). Watercolour. Inscribed and dated, 1825. Provenance: An album of watercolours by Elizabeth Campbell. 8x11 inches.

“We now gained a view of Syracuse situated in the sea; united to the land by drawbridges and guarded by a triple work of strong ramparts. Here were all the remains of five cities, which were united into one of grandeur, power, art, and tyranny; and this, the least of the five, the ancient Ortygia. Napoli, Ticha, Aqradina and Epipole the other four: to the right the port and the opposite promontory, formerly the Pliminygium(?) or castle which defended the entrance of the great port. The remains of the theatre, situated in what was formerly Napoli, or new Town, which also was the largest and most beautiful part; it is cut in the solid rock, of unusual size, even larger than the one at Athens, and the seats are considered to possess a considerable peculiarity, the back part being raised to accommodate the feet of those sitting behind, without in any way inconveniencing the person in front. Some Greek inscriptions have been found on two of the stairs, one supposed the name of the architect, the other of Queen Felistide, of whose history there is no other trace than an ancient medal, the letters of which are supposed to be elucidated by this inscription. The appearance of this fine view is much destroyed by a large building of water mills erected in the centre of the seats; tho’ we can hardly wonder at advantage being taken of an immense flow of water brought hither by ancient Aqueducts. When this present King visited these parts he was petitioned to order their removal as, at a small expense, such a work might be executed, but he turned a deaf ear to the Antiquarians prayer, and the mills grind on. The interior of the theatre is so grown over with trees, it is next to impossible to take in half the circle at a glance. To the left is the modern Aqueduct, below, part of the Amphitheatre, a very inferior work and of the Romans, part of one side, and the remains of a corridor all you see. It was attached to the walls which divided Acradina from Neapolis; nearer the town are some columns, three, either remains of a temple or Forum bases testifying there were many more.”

This work appears in the Group: ELIZABETH CAMPBELL - SICILY 1825

Description

“We now gained a view of Syracuse situated in the sea; united to the land by drawbridges and guarded by a triple work of strong ramparts. Here were all the remains of five cities, which were united into one of grandeur, power, art, and tyranny; and this, the least of the five, the ancient Ortygia. Napoli, Ticha, Aqradina and Epipole the other four: to the right the port and the opposite promontory, formerly the Pliminygium(?) or castle which defended the entrance of the great port. The remains of the theatre, situated in what was formerly Napoli, or new Town, which also was the largest and most beautiful part; it is cut in the solid rock, of unusual size, even larger than the one at Athens, and the seats are considered to possess a considerable peculiarity, the back part being raised to accommodate the feet of those sitting behind, without in any way inconveniencing the person in front. Some Greek inscriptions have been found on two of the stairs, one supposed the name of the architect, the other of Queen Felistide, of whose history there is no other trace than an ancient medal, the letters of which are supposed to be elucidated by this inscription. The appearance of this fine view is much destroyed by a large building of water mills erected in the centre of the seats; tho’ we can hardly wonder at advantage being taken of an immense flow of water brought hither by ancient Aqueducts. When this present King visited these parts he was petitioned to order their removal as, at a small expense, such a work might be executed, but he turned a deaf ear to the Antiquarians prayer, and the mills grind on. The interior of the theatre is so grown over with trees, it is next to impossible to take in half the circle at a glance. To the left is the modern Aqueduct, below, part of the Amphitheatre, a very inferior work and of the Romans, part of one side, and the remains of a corridor all you see. It was attached to the walls which divided Acradina from Neapolis; nearer the town are some columns, three, either remains of a temple or Forum bases testifying there were many more.”