Campbell (Nineteenth Century), Elizabeth
'Temple of Segesta May 16th 1825. Sicily'. Watercolour. Inscribed and dated, 1825. Provenance: An album of watercolours by Elizabeth Campbell.

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8x11 inches.

“We now took to the left and soon had the first and distant view of this fine Temple, standing alone in melancholy grandeur; craggy cliffs below it, seemingly forbidding our near approach; blue and distant mountains behind: not a tree, not a vestige of a living soul, but the sun’s rays through a watery medium just lighting the building: the effect was grand. After a long, dubious, severe ascent, we reached the ground on which, solitary and silent, stands this very fine and large Temple: also of Doric Architecture, the columns not fluted and larger than they are usually. Some say it never was finished, I believe, because no trace is left of the Cell or interior of the Temple. Its position is exceedingly curious, so elevated, so remote from all vestiges of building, tho’ they pretend to say the City was upon a near hill. It is, however, distinguishable at a great distance as we found on our way to Alcamo. The view from it is very fine of a part of the sea, the mountains, etc.”

This work appears in the Group: ELIZABETH CAMPBELL - SICILY 1825

Description

“We now took to the left and soon had the first and distant view of this fine Temple, standing alone in melancholy grandeur; craggy cliffs below it, seemingly forbidding our near approach; blue and distant mountains behind: not a tree, not a vestige of a living soul, but the sun’s rays through a watery medium just lighting the building: the effect was grand. After a long, dubious, severe ascent, we reached the ground on which, solitary and silent, stands this very fine and large Temple: also of Doric Architecture, the columns not fluted and larger than they are usually. Some say it never was finished, I believe, because no trace is left of the Cell or interior of the Temple. Its position is exceedingly curious, so elevated, so remote from all vestiges of building, tho’ they pretend to say the City was upon a near hill. It is, however, distinguishable at a great distance as we found on our way to Alcamo. The view from it is very fine of a part of the sea, the mountains, etc.”